Strict Standards: Declaration of KCommandChain::enqueue() should be compatible with KObjectQueue::enqueue(KObjectHandlable $object, $priority) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/command/chain.php on line 42

Strict Standards: Declaration of KCommandChain::setPriority() should be compatible with KObjectQueue::setPriority(KObjectHandlable $object, $priority) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/command/chain.php on line 42

Strict Standards: Declaration of KCommandChain::getPriority() should be compatible with KObjectQueue::getPriority(KObjectHandlable $object) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/command/chain.php on line 42

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Declaration of KHttpUri::set() should be compatible with KObject::set($property, $value = NULL) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/loader/loader.php on line 253

Strict Standards: Declaration of KHttpUri::get() should be compatible with KObject::get($property = NULL, $default = NULL) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/loader/loader.php on line 253

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/joomla/cache/cache.php on line 19

Strict Standards: Declaration of JCacheStorage::get() should be compatible with JObject::get($property, $default = NULL) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/loader/loader.php on line 253

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/joomla/document/document.php on line 19

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186
Liqueurs
Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter

Find a Specific Spirit

Loading...
Liqueurs


Cointreau PDF Print E-mail
Featured Spirits - Liqueurs

a picture of Cointreau
Cointreau Distillery
France
80 proof

The first bottles of Cointreau (pronounced QUAN-tro), were sold in 1875 after two brothers, Adolphe and Edouard-Jean Cointreau, developed this blend of bitter and sweet orange peels and pure sweet beet alcohol in their small distillery in France. Confectioners by trade, this was not the brothers’ first successful liqueur (their first was a cherry liqueur called guignolet), but it was surely what put them on the map. Cointreau, originally called “Curaçao Blanco Triple Sec,” was the brothers’ take on the popular triple sec/Curaçao liqueurs of the time. Cointreau would quickly become the “gold standard” within that category.

Curaçao is a liqueur flavored with the dried peel of the laraha fruit, an orange-like citrus that developed when Spanish colonists attempted to plant and grow sweet Valencia oranges in the island of Curaçao’s nutrient-poor soil. The resultant fruit was bitter rather than sweet, but their aromatic peels maintained much of the essence of the Valencia varietal. Whereas Curaçao uses only the laraha peel, triple sec blends both bitter and sweet orange. Cointreau, therefore, is technically a triple sec.

But with a big, bold orange essence aroma, sweet orange and vanilla flavor, silky mouth-feel and lip-smacking sugary-orange finish, Cointreau is the “Rolls-Royce” of triple secs. As such, it has played a role as the orange liqueur of choice in many classic cocktails such as the Calvados Cocktail, Corpse Reviver 2, the Original Margarita, Pegu Club Cocktail, Sidecar, Singapore Sling, White Lady, Hoopla and Oriental Cocktail.

 
Chartreuse PDF Print E-mail
Featured Spirits - Liqueurs

a picture of Chartreuse
Chartreuse Distillery
France
110 proof

The story of Chartreuse begins in 1605, when a Marshal of Artillery to French king Henry IV gave to the Carthusian monks (so named after the Chartreuse mountains of their home) a manuscript containing the alchemical formula for an “elixir of long life.” After more than 100 years of study, the “Elixir Végétal” was first produced from a blend of over 130 herbs and plants. This “Elixir Végétal” was later renamed to Chartreuse after the monks that distilled it. Renowned for its vibrant green color, which it supposedly gets from the chlorophyll in the plants from which it is produced, Chartreuse is the only beverage I know of that has a color named after it!

When the French Revolution hit in 1789, the Chartreuse monks (like all religious orders) were forced out of France. Their distillery and their liqueur became property of France, later sold to a company that nearly ran it into the ground. Thankfully, in 1927, a group of businessmen purchased all the shares of the Chartreuse distillery and gifted it back to the Carthusian monks. It is once again distilled by these same monks, who have returned the liqueur to its former glory.

Chartreuse comes in two forms—green and yellow. Green Chartreuse has an incredibly bright herbal and floral nose (mind the alcohol, however). The flavor is sweet and packed with herbs, spices and aromatic flora, with fennel or licorice being perhaps the most noticeable and definable. It is a heavyweight at a whopping 110 proof! The yellow variety is similar, but slightly less intense and sweeter, only clocking in at a more manageable 80 proof. Chartreuse is used in the Widow’s Kiss, Pago Pago, Rainbow Pousse-Cafè, Warday’s Cocktail and The Last Word, to name a few.

 
Bénédictine PDF Print E-mail
Featured Spirits - Liqueurs

a picture of Benedictine
Dom Bénédictine
France
80 proof

Bénédictine is an herbal liqueur with a fantastic story. Legend has it, the recipe dates back to 1510 when a Bénédictine monk by the name of Dom Bernardo Vincelli, renowned for his herbal and alchemical knowledge, crafted a mysterious herbal elixir that quickly became famous throughout France. In 1789, during the French Revolution, the Bénédictine monks were forced to flee their abbey. One of the monks gave several of what they considered their most precious books to a member of the le Grande family, where they sat in a family library, largely ignored, for years.

Then, in 1863, quite by accident, Alexandre le Grande, who happened to be a wine merchant, stumbled across a book, written in gothic script, containing the recipe for Vincelli’s elixir. Le Grande studied it, eventually reproduced it and put it to market, naming it after the monks of its origin—Bénédictine!

As it turns out, most of that story was likely made up by le Grande in an effort to sell more of his liqueur, but to this day it is celebrated as gift from the Bénédictine monks. It is even produced in an extravagant palace in France called Palais Bénédictine.

Bénédictine has a decidedly herbal nose with lots of alcohol behind it. The flavor is sweet and spicy herbal with berry and citrus fruit undertones. Despite being a “liqueur,” Bénédictine is “spirit strength,” (80 proof) so it packs a punch! It is famous in the cocktail world for its use in classics like the Bobby Burns, Singapore Sling, Straits Sling, Vieux Carre Cocktail, Widow’s Kiss, Kentucky Colonel, Rainbow Pousse-Cafè and Savoy Hotel, to name a few.

 
Holz’s Apple Crisp Liqueur PDF Print E-mail
Featured Spirits - Liqueurs

a picture of Holz’s Apple Crisp Liqueur

Produced by our friends at Yahara Bay Distillery in Madison, WI, Holz’s Apple Crisp is a brilliant, spiced apple liqueur that will keep you coming back for more. The aroma is sweetly apple with spicy cinnamon. A perfect blend of apple and spices hit your palate immediately upon tasting, but never is it overwhelming. Rather, the flavors are surprisingly subtle, very clean and eerily like, well, an apple crisp.

This liqueur is great straight or over rocks, but would also be a welcome addition to ciders or mixed in a variety of cocktails. Yahara Bay even proclaims it would be good drizzled over ice cream. I find it hard to argue with that.


 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 3