Strict Standards: Declaration of KCommandChain::enqueue() should be compatible with KObjectQueue::enqueue(KObjectHandlable $object, $priority) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/command/chain.php on line 42

Strict Standards: Declaration of KCommandChain::setPriority() should be compatible with KObjectQueue::setPriority(KObjectHandlable $object, $priority) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/command/chain.php on line 42

Strict Standards: Declaration of KCommandChain::getPriority() should be compatible with KObjectQueue::getPriority(KObjectHandlable $object) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/command/chain.php on line 42

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::load() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 161

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 138

Strict Standards: Declaration of KHttpUri::set() should be compatible with KObject::set($property, $value = NULL) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/loader/loader.php on line 253

Strict Standards: Declaration of KHttpUri::get() should be compatible with KObject::get($property = NULL, $default = NULL) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/loader/loader.php on line 253

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/joomla/cache/cache.php on line 19

Strict Standards: Declaration of JCacheStorage::get() should be compatible with JObject::get($property, $default = NULL) in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/koowa/loader/loader.php on line 253

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::register() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/joomla/document/document.php on line 19

Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186
Blogs
Strict Standards: Non-static method JLoader::import() should not be called statically in /home/trishbish21/public_html/libraries/loader.php on line 186
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Twitter
Home Blogs
Blogs
5 Drinking Myths Debunked: The Dos and Don’ts of Alcohol Consumption
Blogs - Alcoholmanac Blog

GUEST POST | Michael Pines is a personal injury attorney at the Law Offices of Michael Pines, APC in San Diego, California. Pines reached out to us to help communicate his ever-important message about responsible alcohol consumption. We at Alcoholmanac take this topic very seriously and hold it close to our hearts, as it is our purpose to communicate all sides of beverage culture. Safe sipping!


5 Drinking Myths Debunked: The Dos and Don’ts of Alcohol Consumption


By Michael Pines

When our bodies process alcohol, a multitude of variables come into play including weight, gender and foods eaten prior to imbibing. These factors and many others work together to give us a buzz or send us over the proverbial edge. So when it comes to understanding alcohol consumption, there are multiple components that contribute to how our bodies absorb alcohol.

Given the multiple variables involved in how alcohol is processed, it proves difficult to predict whether or not we are actually safe to drive. The truth is that all too often, people make the wrong decisions – sometimes mistakenly – when they drink alcohol and get behind the wheel.

When it comes to debunking common drinking myths, here’s what you need to know to stay safe – and most importantly, stay alive.


MYTH #1: FOOD HINDERS ALCOHOL ABSORPTION

Most of us already know that drinking on an empty stomach can result in quick drunkenness. That’s because the digestive process is one of the largest contributing factors in how alcohol is absorbed in the body.

Don’t assume a large meal clears you to drive

Just because you’ve eaten a large meal prior to drinking doesn’t mean you won’t get drunk. While it’s true that food will help delay the processing of alcohol, it does not mean that you are in the clear. Because the liver can only handle one drink per hour no matter your size, overindulging can quickly lead to an increased blood alcohol concentration (BAC).

Do eat plenty of protein prior to drinking

While food will not entirely stop alcohol absorption, it can help delay the effects as long as you are indulging in only one drink per hour. Foods rich in protein are an excellent choice and can work to your benefit by keeping a safe BAC, all while allowing you to enjoy the relaxing effects of alcohol.

MYTH #2: I’M NOT DRINKING HARD LIQUOR SO I SHOULDN’T BE THAT DRUNK

People who enjoy beer and wine often assume it is a “softer” kind of alcohol as opposed to the harder drinks like vodka, gin or whiskey. But no matter what kind of alcohol you drink, it can still contribute to an unsafe BAC.

Don’t assume beer and wine will get you “less drunk”

Different alcohol types are stronger in alcohol content than others, but whether you get drunk depends simply on how much you have to drink – not the type of alcohol you drink. Wine and beer drinkers are just as much at risk for a DUI or car accident then others who drink hard liquor.

Do know your limits

Regardless of the type of alcohol you drink, you should know that it is never safe to get behind the wheel after drinking. Lines can be too easily crossed. Also, keep in mind that factors like mood, gender and body fat contribute to the way your body processes alcohol, too – so one night of drinking can be dramatically different than another.

MYTH #3: I CAN HANDLE MY ALCOHOL PRETTY WELL!

Tolerance is a physiological effect that occurs when alcohol is consumed regularly. A person exhibiting functional tolerance of alcohol will generally appear less intoxicated than an individual who drinks alcohol less often.

Don’t get cocky

There’s an air of pride for some individuals when it comes to “handling their alcohol.” Regardless of the so-called bragging rights you may think you’re earning, it is never a good idea to think you are above the effects of alcohol consumption. While it’s true that functional tolerance leads to fewer physical indications of drinking, your BAC will rise nonetheless in the presence of alcohol.

Do seek professional help if your drinking gets out of control

It takes a big person to admit there’s a problem. If you suspect that your functional tolerance has crossed the line into functional alcoholism, consider talking to a professional such as your doctor or therapist for help.

MYTH #4: I CAN STILL DRINK WHILE TAKING MEDS – I FEEL FINE!

No doubt about it: mixing medications and alcohol can lead to dramatic, unwanted effects. Because alcohol is considered a drug, any combination of other medications along with drinking can lead to catastrophic results.

Don’t mix meds and alcohol

Interactions between alcohol and drugs – even over-the-counter – can cause changes in the properties of the drug, leading to an increased alcoholic effect. Pain killers or cold medicine when combined with alcohol can multiply the effects of alcohol considerably, and your BAC level may consequently rise even when you feel physically fine in the moment.

Do limit your intake

It goes without saying that your alcohol consumption should be limited when you are taking medication. If you need to take medication long-term, such as for depression or a chronic illness, be sure to discuss your alcohol consumption with your doctor prior to drinking. And always remember that drinking in the presence of drugs only amplifies its effects, so it’s never a good idea to get behind the wheel even when you have had little to drink.

MYTH #5: I HAD A DRINK AN HOUR AGO SO I AM SAFE TO DRIVE

How many times have we heard a drunken person utter those very words?  The truth is that BAC levels can increase significantly just one hour after having a drink. That’s right – your alcohol concentration may actually be higher one hour after having imbibed. That’s because in the presence of multiple variables, your blood alcohol concentration levels can actually increase an hour later as the drink begins to get processed by your body.

Don’t get behind the wheel

The safest rule of thumb: just don’t drive! Any amount of alcohol increases your risk of getting into a car accident – and considering your BAC levels can rise even after waiting an hour after drinking, it’s just a risk not worth taking.

Do get a cab ride home

If you’ve had alcohol, it’s a safe bet to say you should get a cab instead of driving home. The best way to prevent an alcohol-related accident is by preplanning, so if you intend to participate in the night’s festivities, you should pre-pay your ride home or designate a driver well ahead of time.

a photo of Michael PinesAbout Michael Pines

Michael Pines is a personal injury attorney at the Law Offices of Michael Pines, APC in San Diego, California. He is an accident and injury prevention expert, on a campaign to end senseless injury one article at a time.

 
Whiskey and Big, Bad, Oxidation
Blogs - Grains of Wrath

2 bottles of Rittenhouse Rye

Let's talk about oxidation. It's a term thrown around in whiskey that many don't fully understand, myself included. The prevailing thought is that whiskey will "turn" or "go bad" if you leave it in a bottle, sealed, and less than 1/3 or 1/4 full. The oxygen in the bottle will oxidize your precious alcohol and leave you with a sub-par product. Distilleries also love to tell you as soon as your bottle is down to that magic 1/3 line, you better drink it in a hurry and go buy a new bottle. To me, that sounds like a great way to sell more product.


My very unscientific experiment today revolves around one of my favorite pours, Rittenhouse Rye Bottled in Bond 100 proof. I started with two bottles of the rye, one still factory sealed, and another (that by some miracle) has remained open and unfinished for about 2 years; it sits with about 2 oz in it. The open bottle has sat on my liquor shelf the whole time, never in direct sunlight, kept at room temperature. Thanks to some friends at Great Lakes Distillery, I tested the open bottle of Rittenhouse to see if there was any alcohol loss, another common belief for long storage open bottles, but it still clocked in at 99.2 proof. Score one for screw tops over corks, perhaps.


Tasting was done in identical copita glasses, neat. I did a full analysis of the "old" opened bottle followed by the "new" bottle, then tasted back and forth.

2 bottles of Rittenhouse Rye with glasses


Nose:

Old: Sweet with Rye Spice, a little soft for a 99.2 proof offering

New: Virtually identical, perhaps a touch more muted, but that could be in my head

Taste:

Old: Big spice, sweet grain warmth, full mouth feel

New: Sweet, subtle spice, rich, grain

Finish:

Old: Long, sticky, spice mixed with butterscotch sweetness

New: Medium to Long, spicy sweet grain


Verdict:
I like the "old" bottle better. Had a bigger spice note and a longer finish. Did the "old" bottle get helped by oxidation? Did the screw top make a difference in this instead of testing corked bottles? Could this just be the slight variance in a whiskey made 2 years apart? Has the rye boom forced a slightly less quality rye into the bottle? I don't have the answers to these, but, I would put money on it just being the slightly inconsistent nature of whiskey offerings. I feel oxidation played no factor in the flavor of the "old" bottle and I will not be stricken with panic anytime a bottle dips below 1/3. However, I've heard worse excuses for calling a few friends over to help you finish off a bottle (or two).


Yours in Whiskey,

Ross

 
Pizza Man to Re-open on Downer Ave
Blogs - Alcoholmanac Blog

a picture of the old Pizza Man


That's right friends, 3 years after the fateful fire that destroyed Pizza Man and half a block of other businesses and residences on North Ave, Pizza Man has announced today on its Facebook page that they will be re-opening their beloved Milwaukee restaurant on Downer Ave! We have been teased by rumors of Pizza Man finding a new location for years, but this one seems to be the real deal, coming straight from the source. Below is the full press release from Pizza Man owner Mike Amidzich:

MILWAUKEE (Nov. 15, 2012) Forty-two years after its birth and three years after its fiery demise, Milwaukee’s iconic Pizza Man restaurant has taken a first step toward re-opening. Restaurant owner Mike Amidzich today announced he has signed a letter of intent to lease property for a new Pizza Man.

Amidzich will own and run the new Pizza Man with backing from a group of local investors. The concept will remain the same as at the original Pizza Man, with a variety of thin and deep dish pizzas, along with an eclectic array of specialty dinners like wild boar ravioli, chicken artichoke, ribs, spinach crab cheese melt, fresh calamari, steamed mussels and their famous escargot. Pizza Man will also start to revive its famed 600-choice (by the glass) wine list, which earned it 16 straight “Awards of Excellence” from Wine Spectator magazine. The tentative new location will be less than a mile from the restaurant’s previous home on the corner of E. North and N. Oakland avenues.

“Taking this first step towards re-opening is a great 42nd birthday present for Pizza Man,” said Amidzich. “After three years of searching for the right investors and the right location, we are finally starting the process to re-open. We hope to become part of this neighborhood again. That said, there are many hurdles to overcome. We know we will need the support of a lot of people, including the City and neighborhood, to make this project a reality.”

The original Pizza Man opened on Nov. 15, 1970 and eventually became an East Side landmark, as popular with wine aficionados as it was with pizza-loving UWM students. It was destroyed by fire in January 2010 along with several other businesses and apartments in a massive blaze that caused an estimated $3 million in damage.

Amidzich’s plans for the new location include two floors of seating, along with a 2nd-floor outdoor terrace. “The unique outdoor seating component is essential to the success of Pizza Man, and was what attracted me to this location,” said Amidzich.
Rinka Chung Architecture, Inc. has been hired to design the renovation. “We plan to take a contemporary approach to the design that preserves the rustic urban charm of the original Pizza Man,” said Matt Rinka. “The outdoor seating component is what drew Mike to the location and the design, but will also help connect the energy of Pizza Man to the street, bringing vitality to an important corner.”

Past – and future – Pizza Man customers can receive updates on (and support) the progress toward re-opening by clicking “Like” on the Pizza Man Facebook page. Pizza Man is also on Twitter at @pizzamanmke.


We're sure we speak collectively for Milwaukee pizza and wine lovers when we say just how excited we at the prospect of welcoming back an iconic Milwaukee restaurant!

 
Kanpai Launches New Happy Hour Specials
Blogs - Alcoholmanac Blog

a picture of the Kanpai RollGood news to our fellow sushi lovers out there: Kanpai, the Third Ward's newest sushi and izakaya (Japanese small plate) restaurant has announced its new Happy Hour program. In an effort to drive more non-peak business, Kanpai is now offering up to 50% off all sushi rolls, as well as specials on select kitchen tapas and bar items! We know where we'll be spending our early evenings!

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next > End >>

Page 5 of 7